Comic Wallet #4: Beautiful Flowers from Shadow Star

~ Sam

there is such a thing as Western Superflat!
check out this article on Charlie Immer, my new favorite artist? (i say that a lot):
http://thefoxisblack.com/2011/03/18/the-crazy-candy-coated-paintings-of-charlie-immer/

there is such a thing as Western Superflat!

check out this article on Charlie Immer, my new favorite artist? (i say that a lot):

http://thefoxisblack.com/2011/03/18/the-crazy-candy-coated-paintings-of-charlie-immer/

Bulbasaur
by Sam 

Bulbasaur

by Sam 

What is Superflat?: Where Anime fits in Post-Modern CultureA panel discussion with speakers Sam Kusek and Eric Shorey
Join us as we try and parse through the difficulties and nuances of the complex neologism coined by Takashi Murakami: “Superflat.”  Usually used to refer to a specific style or group of post-modern Japanese artists (Yoshitomo Nara, Chiho Aoshima, Satoshi Kon, among others), Superflat art self-reflexively critiques and celebrates anime  and otaku culture. The tropes of superflatism include: one dimensionality,  saturated color, hyper-sexuality and infantaliziation, blurred lines  between fantasy and reality, fetishism (cultural and sexual), and the ambiguous engagement with a kind of  national-character mythos (often with the atom bomb) and late capitalist economic structures.
Contradictorily: “Superflat” can also be used to describe certain  phenomena within Asian (and sometimes American) culture, the same  phenomena that Superflat art often criticizes.  So things like: Power Rangers, Street Fighter, Ultraman, and Godzilla can appropriately be  called “Superflat” as well.  Can Superflat also be seen as a sensibility, a mode of engaging with anime and other cultural texts?  What anime can be criticized by a super-flat apparatus, and what anime could be called Superflat?
This panel will specifically discuss various movies, games, and cultural phenomenon like: FLCL, Paranoia Agent, the Street Fighter franchise of video games, and Hello Kitty.  Through this discussion, we will atempt to create a more concrete definition of Superflat and figure out where and how anime can and should be analyzed under a post-modern lens. 
Anime Boston, April 23, 10pm(we are super excited.)

What is Superflat?: Where Anime fits in Post-Modern Culture
A panel discussion with speakers Sam Kusek and Eric Shorey

Join us as we try and parse through the difficulties and nuances of the complex neologism coined by Takashi Murakami: “Superflat.”  Usually used to refer to a specific style or group of post-modern Japanese artists (Yoshitomo Nara, Chiho Aoshima, Satoshi Kon, among others), Superflat art self-reflexively critiques and celebrates anime and otaku culture. The tropes of superflatism include: one dimensionality, saturated color, hyper-sexuality and infantaliziation, blurred lines between fantasy and reality, fetishism (cultural and sexual), and the ambiguous engagement with a kind of national-character mythos (often with the atom bomb) and late capitalist economic structures.

Contradictorily: “Superflat” can also be used to describe certain phenomena within Asian (and sometimes American) culture, the same phenomena that Superflat art often criticizes.  So things like: Power Rangers, Street Fighter, Ultraman, and Godzilla can appropriately be called “Superflat” as well.  Can Superflat also be seen as a sensibility, a mode of engaging with anime and other cultural texts?  What anime can be criticized by a super-flat apparatus, and what anime could be called Superflat?

This panel will specifically discuss various movies, games, and cultural phenomenon like: FLCL, Paranoia Agent, the Street Fighter franchise of video games, and Hello Kitty.  Through this discussion, we will atempt to create a more concrete definition of Superflat and figure out where and how anime can and should be analyzed under a post-modern lens. 

Anime Boston, April 23, 10pm
(we are super excited.)

Thousands of twitching flashes turned the western horizon into a sea of flowers.
pre-futurism futurism by Junger from Storm of Steel
(an actual account of WWI)